How to Make Recruiters Work for You Thursday, May 31 2012 

http://moneyland.time.com/2012/05/29/how-to-make-recruiters-work-for-you/?iid=pf-main-mostpop1

A call from a recruiter is more likely to be for their gain than yours. Still, that call could be the springboard for your next jump up the career ladder.

With the economy still sputtering and the unemployed outnumbering job vacancies by six to one, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, recruiters and headhunters are becoming an increasingly vital contact. Last year they helped nearly 13 million U.S. workers find temporary, contract or permanent jobs, and more than 90% of U.S. companies now use staffing firms to fill vacancies, according to the American Staffing Association.

As you might expect, technology, health care and engineering are some of the major industries that are looking to hire at the moment, while ironically enough, the recruitment industry itself is one of the biggest boomers. (The U.S. Department of Labor expecting it to grow more than 50% by 2014.) While you might not expect it, you could soon get a call from one these smooth-talkers, so here are TIME Moneyland’s top tips for how to make recruiters work for you.

1. Set The Tone

It’s important to establish a dynamic from the outset and ensure your relationship starts on a comfortable footing. For Alison Doyle, job search expert for About.com, the first call is all about laying down cards on the table at the earliest point. “It’s important to set the tone at the very beginning of your relationship,” she says. “Find out what information the recruiter needs from you and if they have specific openings they are interested in talking to you about.” She also recommends determining how you will stay in contact with the recruiter, and how often.

 

12 Ways to Optimize Your Resume for Applicant Tracking Systems Wednesday, May 30 2012 

http://mashable.com/2012/05/27/resume-tracking-systems/

You filled out the job application, updated your resume and clicked “Submit.” But as the days or weeks pass, you never receive a phone call or email from the employer. What happened?

Unbeknownst to many job seekers, a whopping 72% of resumes are never seen by human eyes. Why? Well, employers large and small now use applicant tracking software to parse the information from your resume and map it into a database called an ATS (applicant tracking system). From this information, the system will assign you a score based on how well you match the job the employer is trying to fill, and then rank and sort all candidates. Naturally, the potential employees with the highest scores move on, while others are left in the dust.

Wondering how you can optimize your resume and rank highly in the employer’s ATS? Here are several tricks to improving your resume’s score.

1. Use Language from the Job Description: Look through the job listing to determine the skills required. Identify industry terms, buzzwords and jargon the hiring manager uses most frequently in the description and incorporate these words into your resume when possible and applicable — the ATS is looking for these keywords.

Funny Interview Questions Monday, May 28 2012 

http://jobsearch.about.com/b/2012/05/24/funny-interview-questions.htm

There are interview questions that are funny and some that are just plain strange, even though they weren’t meant to be when they were asked.

Glassdoor.com has spent time going through the thousands of interview questions shared by job candidates to come up with a list of the Top 25 Oddball Interview Questions.

  1. “If you were shrunk to the size of a pencil and put in a blender, how would you get out?” – Asked at Goldman Sachs, Analyst position
  2. “How many ridges [are there] around a quarter?” – Asked at Deloitte, Project Analyst position
  3. “What is the philosophy of Martial Arts?” – Asked at Aflac, Sales Associate position
  4. “Explain [to] me what has happened in this country during the last 10 years.” – Asked at Boston Consulting, Consultant position
  5. “Rate yourself on a scale of 1 to 10 how weird you are.” – Asked at Capital One, Operations Analyst position

What To Highlight In Your Resume When You Have Minimal Experience Monday, May 28 2012 

http://comerecommended.com/publish2/what-to-highlight-in-your-resume-when-you-have-minimal-experience/

As a student or recent graduate, it can be difficult to draft a resume when you don’t have a ton of work experience under your belt. But this isn’t the only thing potential employers want to see on your resume. There are plenty of other things you can highlight on your resume, even when you have a small amount of work experience. Here are some to consider:

  1. Volunteer experience. If you’ve volunteered your time at an organization where you’ve put your skills to use, this is certainly something to include on your resume. For instance, perhaps your education focused on marketing, and you spent five hours per week at your local animal shelter assisting in creating marketing materials. This is something you should share on your resume

– This article does briefly highlight a number of ways to flesh out a résumé when you don’t have much experience. I would encourage someone in this position to also look at any sports or extra-curricular activities you have participated in, as it gives an excellent indication of relevant skills/ qualities you may have, such as dedication, timekeeping and perseverance

– Conduit

4 Reasons Resumes Are Rejected Sunday, May 27 2012 

http://thegrindstone.com/career-management/4-reasons-resumes-are-rejected-745/

Recruiters spend countless hours reviewing resumes and screening candidates. In fact, they spend so much time scanning resumes, they can often do it in one minute or less.

As disappointing as that may be given all the hard work you put into your resume, it’s the unfortunate reality…and with such a small amount of time to make an impression, it’s no wonder they occasionally get it wrong. You may have been the perfect person for the position, but because you failed to successfully package yourself, your resume and your chances end up meeting their demise with the click of a mouse. Read on to learn the top four reasons your resume may end up in recycle bin or folder.

1. The length: Have you ever read a magazine article, short story, blog, etc. and remember thinking “Get to the point already?” Well, recruiters have this same thought when they read over a three-page resume. Nine times out of 10 they will probably just move it to the rejection stack.

 

– I disagree with a few parts of this article, length of resume is very much dependent on the type of role you are applying for i.e. it would be inappropriate for an executive role to have a brief resume, as with IT roles where it is necessary to give a significant amount of detail about your technical expertise. I also don’t necessarily think that a cover letter is a deal breaker – if your résumé is well written, and specific to the role you are applying for, a cover letter, or lack thereof, is not going to damage your chances.

However, spelling and grammar errors can automatically place your résumé in the reject pile. I would suggest having someone else, with a fresh set of eyes, review it before sending it anywhere.

– Conduit

What CEOs Expect From An Interview Candidate Friday, May 25 2012 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahsweeney/2012/05/23/what-ceos-expect-from-an-interview-candidate/

Having written about what CEOs look for in the resumes of job applicants last week, I enjoyed it so much I thought I’d bring you along for the first interview.

First interviews are tricky because like a resume, there’s no way of knowing exactly what the prospective employer is expecting to hear you say and whether the answers you give are indeed the “right” answers. All you can do, beyond ignoring that pile of butterflies in your stomach, is take a deep breath, put on your best tailored suit, and come in confident about what you do know about the place you’re applying to work with.

But there are ways to kick your first impression up a higher notch than showing up in a sharp suit. Expectations that I like to look for aim to keep the interviewing process less nerve-wracking and more… well… just less nerve-wracking than it needs to be.

Is there a gap growing in your resume? Friday, May 25 2012 

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505125_162-57433387/is-there-a-gap-growing-in-your-resume/?tag=nl.e713

I’m getting more emails from people who’ve been out of work quite a long time. Not surprisingly, they’re very dispirited but what makes it worse is that they are worrying about how to cover the gap that is growing in their resume. Being out of work is debilitating because your morale plummets, your confidence starts to hemorrhage and your passion for network decidedly dwindles. What should you do?

 

I confronted this problem many years ago when I sold my business, moved continents and had my first child – all at pretty much the same time. (I would not recommend this to anyone.) So I found myself in a new city where I knew no one – so no networking. The industry I knew well – television – wasn’t a going concern in my new home. My confidence was rock bottom – having a baby at home will do that to you. What was I to do?

Six Secrets to Quickly Land the Job Thursday, May 24 2012 

http://www.monsterworking.com/2012/05/11/six-secret/

More employers are hiring in a hurry, making decisions within days or in some cases hours of meeting great candidates.

My new piece on Fortune.com tells how and why companies are doing this, and from many indications this is a trend that could accelerate in the next few years, as Baby Boomers and others retire or reinvent themselves. Companies are concerned if they don’t hire quickly, their top candidate will move elsewhere or start their own enterprises.

So how do you as a candidate get snatched up faster, by a company that is determined to build its team quickly? The key, of course, is to be the kind of talent that looks like a $40 steak at Ruth’s Chris Steak House –- so delicious and well-prepared that any manager will bite.

Here are some other ways to speed your hiring along:


 

 

Can a side gig help your career? Thursday, May 24 2012 

http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2012/05/17/can-a-side-gig-help-your-career/?iid=SF_SB_LN

Moonlighting has always been part of American work culture, though it’s not a lifestyle many managers have encouraged. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only about 5% of workers officially hold more than one job. Some organizations have policies against extra hours work, both for liability and productivity reasons. There are 168 hours in a week, and time you’re spending at a second job or on your own side business is time you’re not dreaming up new ideas for your employer.

But changes in technology and the way people work are leading some to rethink this idea. Certain kinds of moonlighting may actually help you in your main job, and wise organizations can embrace, rather than squelch, entrepreneurial zeal.

 

 


Epic Win Thursday, May 24 2012 

From http://geeksarewired.com/2012/04/20/epic-win/

#WIN

I absolutely love this infographic for its simplicity, however, I would encourage anyone who sits in the ‘Rich but Bored’ category to do something about it!! If you are truly good at something, and are well paid for it, there is absolutely a way to make your job more fulfilling – find a sponsor, or talk to your manager about finding ways to get you into the #Win space – otherwise they may just lose one of there best staff, and they certainly don’t want that.

It also is just as relevant when you are searching for a job – where do you want to be? Is ‘Rich but Bored’ going to give you job satisfaction? Or do you only go to work to pay the bills?

 

– Conduit

 

 

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