The Sting of Rejection Thursday, Jun 7 2012 

http://fistfuloftalent.com/2012/06/the-sting-of-rejection.html

Being out of work is beyond disheartening.  I’ve been out of work for a prolonged amount of time twice in my career, and it was awful; it made me incredibly thankful for my wife, and made me question practically everything else.  Now, though, I’m employed, and I’m hiring!

Here’s the problem, though: I can’t hire everyone.  My recruiting team and I have fifteen jobs open as I write this.  In the last thirty days, we’ve gotten just over 500 resumes for these jobs.  These aren’t evenly distributed, either.  Yes, I’m averaging thirty applicants per job, but for a few of these, I’m *still* looking for candidates!

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How to create the ultimate LinkedIn profile in 6 steps Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/8e1c7470-27c6-410f-bc02-1d14db37da28.aspx

LinkedIn is the social network for business professionals and networking. With 161 millions membersto date, it’s one of the most popular social networks. Are you using it to its fullest potential?

While we hear a lot about Facebook and Twitter for lead generation, LinkedIn can be just as good—if not better—if you spend a little time optimizing your profile.

 

Here is the ultimate cheat sheet to create your LinkedIn profile:

 

1. Use a professional picture.

Use a professional picture you wouldn’t mind your mother-in-law or grandmother seeing. This is not the time for shirtless photos (men) or duck pouts (ladies).

Despite what people say, first impressions count. You don’t necessarily need to have a photo of yourself in a suit and tie, but make sure you consider your audience, branding, and what kind of message you’d like to portray. Your profile picture must be square, no larger than 4MB, and be in a JPG, GIF or PNG file format.


In Your Job Search, Are You Looking for Excuses or Solutions? Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

http://www.careerrocketeer.com/2012/05/in-your-job-search-are-you-looking-for-excuses-or-solutions.html

Are you a “glass is half full” or “glass is half empty” kind of person?

Some people… whenever they hit an obstacle in their job search or in their life… they stall, and decide that the obstacle looms so large that it’s unlikely they will be able to get past it. When they talk to others, they can describe the obstacle in great detail. Clearly, they have a good excuse. It’s obvious why it’s “impossible” to go further.

Others… may see the same obstacle, and begin exploring how they can get around it, over it, under it, or through it. They realize they have a challenge. They understand that it may take some creativity and harder work than expected, however, they are determined to find a solution. They decide they are not going to be kept from their destination by an obstacle in the road, and as a result, they often achieve the “impossible”.

 

How to Make Recruiters Work for You Thursday, May 31 2012 

http://moneyland.time.com/2012/05/29/how-to-make-recruiters-work-for-you/?iid=pf-main-mostpop1

A call from a recruiter is more likely to be for their gain than yours. Still, that call could be the springboard for your next jump up the career ladder.

With the economy still sputtering and the unemployed outnumbering job vacancies by six to one, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, recruiters and headhunters are becoming an increasingly vital contact. Last year they helped nearly 13 million U.S. workers find temporary, contract or permanent jobs, and more than 90% of U.S. companies now use staffing firms to fill vacancies, according to the American Staffing Association.

As you might expect, technology, health care and engineering are some of the major industries that are looking to hire at the moment, while ironically enough, the recruitment industry itself is one of the biggest boomers. (The U.S. Department of Labor expecting it to grow more than 50% by 2014.) While you might not expect it, you could soon get a call from one these smooth-talkers, so here are TIME Moneyland’s top tips for how to make recruiters work for you.

1. Set The Tone

It’s important to establish a dynamic from the outset and ensure your relationship starts on a comfortable footing. For Alison Doyle, job search expert for About.com, the first call is all about laying down cards on the table at the earliest point. “It’s important to set the tone at the very beginning of your relationship,” she says. “Find out what information the recruiter needs from you and if they have specific openings they are interested in talking to you about.” She also recommends determining how you will stay in contact with the recruiter, and how often.

 

Six Secrets to Quickly Land the Job Thursday, May 24 2012 

http://www.monsterworking.com/2012/05/11/six-secret/

More employers are hiring in a hurry, making decisions within days or in some cases hours of meeting great candidates.

My new piece on Fortune.com tells how and why companies are doing this, and from many indications this is a trend that could accelerate in the next few years, as Baby Boomers and others retire or reinvent themselves. Companies are concerned if they don’t hire quickly, their top candidate will move elsewhere or start their own enterprises.

So how do you as a candidate get snatched up faster, by a company that is determined to build its team quickly? The key, of course, is to be the kind of talent that looks like a $40 steak at Ruth’s Chris Steak House –- so delicious and well-prepared that any manager will bite.

Here are some other ways to speed your hiring along:


 

 

How to Juggle Multiple Job Offers Wednesday, May 23 2012 

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/05/21/how-to-juggle-multiple-job-offers

A job offer is usually welcome news—unless it comes while you’re waiting to hear about a different job you really want with a different employer.

While many job-seekers might see this as a good problem to have, it’s a tough spot to be in. And most job-seekers aren’t sure how to navigate it well. After all, can you put the first company off, and if so, for how long? What should you say to the first company in the meantime? And can you take the offer but rescind your acceptance later if the other job comes through?

 

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

http://www.thedailymuse.com/job-search/i-spy-how-to-scope-out-a-company-before-the-interview/

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

On top of that, if you’ve built a good relationship with the recruiter or the person scheduling your interview, use that relationship to your advantage. Ask her if there’s anything you should know about each of your interviewers, or “what is (insert interviewer’s name here) looking for in the perfect candidate?” She may not share all, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

 

 

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

 

Soft skills still outweigh education in entry-level hires: infographic Tuesday, May 22 2012 

http://econsultancy.com/uk/blog/9816-soft-skills-still-outweigh-education-in-entry-level-hires-infographic-2

Warnings signs and tips for job seekers Tuesday, May 22 2012 

http://chrisreid.typepad.com/blog/2012/05/warnings-signs-and-tips-for-job-seekers.html

In today’s market there is a lot of choice when it comes to looking for a new role. The volume of vacancies in the IT sector is incredibly high as we climb out of the recession and the battle for quality resource is at unprecedented levels. But things aren’t always what they seem and I’m about to outline some of the pitfalls you should try to avoid as a candidate when you are looking for a new role in today’s employment climate.

Everybody has one, if not several, stories of being mucked around by a recruiter when they have applied for a job. The common complaint I hear is that they received no response back on their initial application or even worse they are spoken to by the recruiter and agree to have their details presented to the client to then never hear from the recruiter again. The truth of what is going on here is that the recruiter is more than likely “fishing”. They haven’t done a thorough enough job defining the requirement with the client up front and therefore spend most of their days on a wild goose chase and unfortunately the innocent party in the equation (the candidate) receives the rough end of the stick by receiving no feedback.

 

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