10 Job Interview Tips From A CEO Headhunter Friday, Jun 15 2012 

http://www.fastcompany.com/1839723/9-job-interview-tips-from-a-ceo-headhunter

Whether you’re being interviewed to be an intern or a CEO, you’re going to run into a few notoriously tricky questions–here’s a road map of what you’ll be asked, and how to craft impressive answers to even the toughest questions.

No two situations are ever exactly the same, but as a general guide, these are the types of questions that could come up in a typical interview.

1. Why don’t you tell me about yourself?

This question, often the interview opener, has a crucial objective: to see how you handle yourself in unstructured situations. The recruiter wants to see how articulate you are, how confident you are, and generally what type of impression you would make on the people with whom you come into contact on the job. The recruiter also wants to learn about the trajectory of your career and to get a sense of what you think is important and what has caused you to perform well.

Most candidates find this question a difficult one to answer. However, the upside is that this question offers an opportunity to describe yourself positively and focus the interview on your strengths. Be prepared to deal with it.

There are many ways to respond to this question correctly and just one wrong way: by asking, “What do you want to know?” You need to develop a good answer to this question, practice it, and be able to deliver it with poise and confidence.

The right response is twofold: focus on what interests the interviewer, and highlight your most important accomplishments.

Focus on what interests the interviewer

Do not dwell on your personal history–that is not why you are there. Start with your most recent employment and explain why you are well qualified for the position. The key to all successful interviewing is to match your qualifications to what the interviewer is looking for. You want to be selling what the buyer is buying.

Highlight Important Accomplishments

Have a story ready that illustrates your best professional qualities. For example, if you tell an interviewer that people describe you as creative, provide a brief story that shows how you have been creative in achieving your goals.

Stories are powerful and are what people remember most.

A good interviewee will memorize a 60-second commercial that clearly demonstrates why he or she is the best person for the job.

2. How long have you been with your current (or former) employer?

This is a hot-button question if your résumé reflects considerable job-hopping. Excellent performers tend to stay in their jobs at least three to five years. They implement course corrections, bring in new resources, and, in general, learn how to survive–that’s why they are valued by prospective employers.

If your résumé reflects jobs with companies that were acquired, moved, closed, or downsized, it is still viewed as a job-hopper’s history. Volunteer and go to events where hiring authorities may be found. Ratchet up your networking to include anything that exposes you to hiring authorities who can get past your tenure issue because now they know you. Your networking efforts have never been so important.


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The Sting of Rejection Thursday, Jun 7 2012 

http://fistfuloftalent.com/2012/06/the-sting-of-rejection.html

Being out of work is beyond disheartening.  I’ve been out of work for a prolonged amount of time twice in my career, and it was awful; it made me incredibly thankful for my wife, and made me question practically everything else.  Now, though, I’m employed, and I’m hiring!

Here’s the problem, though: I can’t hire everyone.  My recruiting team and I have fifteen jobs open as I write this.  In the last thirty days, we’ve gotten just over 500 resumes for these jobs.  These aren’t evenly distributed, either.  Yes, I’m averaging thirty applicants per job, but for a few of these, I’m *still* looking for candidates!

Six Secrets to Quickly Land the Job Thursday, May 24 2012 

http://www.monsterworking.com/2012/05/11/six-secret/

More employers are hiring in a hurry, making decisions within days or in some cases hours of meeting great candidates.

My new piece on Fortune.com tells how and why companies are doing this, and from many indications this is a trend that could accelerate in the next few years, as Baby Boomers and others retire or reinvent themselves. Companies are concerned if they don’t hire quickly, their top candidate will move elsewhere or start their own enterprises.

So how do you as a candidate get snatched up faster, by a company that is determined to build its team quickly? The key, of course, is to be the kind of talent that looks like a $40 steak at Ruth’s Chris Steak House –- so delicious and well-prepared that any manager will bite.

Here are some other ways to speed your hiring along:


 

 

How to guarantee success at an assessment centre Tuesday, May 15 2012 

http://www.unigrad.com.au/Blogs/post/2012/05/15/How-to-guarantee-success-at-an-assessment-centre.aspx

An assessment centre is essentially a group interview that you will attend alongside other candidates who are applying for the same role. In most cases, the potential employer will invite you to attend a centre held on their premises or in hired venues nearby. There may be anywhere from 6-40 other candidates attending and you could be there for anywhere between 3-7 hours.

During the assessment centre you will participate in a range of activities that are designed to assess your competency, or level of ability, against the organisation’s own competency framework.

The reason for having a range of activities is to give all candidates, regardless of personality style or work preference, an equal opportunity to demonstrate their level of competence in different situations such as in a team, in pairs or as an individual.

So how do you successfully approach an assessment centre? Here’s five tips that have proven to work for many graduates:

Don’t just do it – show the assessors you’re doing it

Remember when you passed your driving test. You didn’t just need to look in your mirror before you took a turn, you had to move your head to show the examiner you were looking. It’s the same in an assessment centre. You not only have to listen to what people are saying, you have to show the assessors you are listening through body language and feedback.