10 Job Interview Tips From A CEO Headhunter Friday, Jun 15 2012 

http://www.fastcompany.com/1839723/9-job-interview-tips-from-a-ceo-headhunter

Whether you’re being interviewed to be an intern or a CEO, you’re going to run into a few notoriously tricky questions–here’s a road map of what you’ll be asked, and how to craft impressive answers to even the toughest questions.

No two situations are ever exactly the same, but as a general guide, these are the types of questions that could come up in a typical interview.

1. Why don’t you tell me about yourself?

This question, often the interview opener, has a crucial objective: to see how you handle yourself in unstructured situations. The recruiter wants to see how articulate you are, how confident you are, and generally what type of impression you would make on the people with whom you come into contact on the job. The recruiter also wants to learn about the trajectory of your career and to get a sense of what you think is important and what has caused you to perform well.

Most candidates find this question a difficult one to answer. However, the upside is that this question offers an opportunity to describe yourself positively and focus the interview on your strengths. Be prepared to deal with it.

There are many ways to respond to this question correctly and just one wrong way: by asking, “What do you want to know?” You need to develop a good answer to this question, practice it, and be able to deliver it with poise and confidence.

The right response is twofold: focus on what interests the interviewer, and highlight your most important accomplishments.

Focus on what interests the interviewer

Do not dwell on your personal history–that is not why you are there. Start with your most recent employment and explain why you are well qualified for the position. The key to all successful interviewing is to match your qualifications to what the interviewer is looking for. You want to be selling what the buyer is buying.

Highlight Important Accomplishments

Have a story ready that illustrates your best professional qualities. For example, if you tell an interviewer that people describe you as creative, provide a brief story that shows how you have been creative in achieving your goals.

Stories are powerful and are what people remember most.

A good interviewee will memorize a 60-second commercial that clearly demonstrates why he or she is the best person for the job.

2. How long have you been with your current (or former) employer?

This is a hot-button question if your résumé reflects considerable job-hopping. Excellent performers tend to stay in their jobs at least three to five years. They implement course corrections, bring in new resources, and, in general, learn how to survive–that’s why they are valued by prospective employers.

If your résumé reflects jobs with companies that were acquired, moved, closed, or downsized, it is still viewed as a job-hopper’s history. Volunteer and go to events where hiring authorities may be found. Ratchet up your networking to include anything that exposes you to hiring authorities who can get past your tenure issue because now they know you. Your networking efforts have never been so important.


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10 Questions You Need To Ask In A Job Interview Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

http://thegrindstone.com/work-life-balance/10-questions-you-need-to-ask-in-a-job-interview-689/

If you’re a job seeker, then you know all about job interviews. You know what to wear, when to show up, and the answers to the toughest questions that are bound to come your way.

One surprising thing that not every job seeker knows about interviews is the fact that an interview is a two-way street. Just like an informational interview, a job interview should end with both interviewer and interviewee feeling informed.

What does this mean?

When a job interview is effectively a two-way street, the job seeker interviews the interviewer and gains more information in order to make an adequate decision about whether or not the position is a good fit for them.

4 Major Interview Mistakes (and How to Recover) Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

4 Interview Mistakes and How to Recover

After sending out countless resumes, you’ve finally landed a job interview with your dream company. You’ve picked the perfect outfit, tucked ample copies of your resume into your folder, and practiced your answers over and over.

And then—it happens. You realize the interview was at 11:30, not 1:30. You spot an error on your resume. Or you make some other totally avoidable mistake that you know, backwards and forwards, that you should never, ever make as an interviewee.

No matter how thoroughly you prepare, mistakes can still happen during the job application and interview process. But, they don’t always mean game over—yes, even imperfect people get jobs. If you’ve made one of these common blunders, a few key steps can help you make the best of a bad situation.

 

Funny Interview Questions Monday, May 28 2012 

http://jobsearch.about.com/b/2012/05/24/funny-interview-questions.htm

There are interview questions that are funny and some that are just plain strange, even though they weren’t meant to be when they were asked.

Glassdoor.com has spent time going through the thousands of interview questions shared by job candidates to come up with a list of the Top 25 Oddball Interview Questions.

  1. “If you were shrunk to the size of a pencil and put in a blender, how would you get out?” – Asked at Goldman Sachs, Analyst position
  2. “How many ridges [are there] around a quarter?” – Asked at Deloitte, Project Analyst position
  3. “What is the philosophy of Martial Arts?” – Asked at Aflac, Sales Associate position
  4. “Explain [to] me what has happened in this country during the last 10 years.” – Asked at Boston Consulting, Consultant position
  5. “Rate yourself on a scale of 1 to 10 how weird you are.” – Asked at Capital One, Operations Analyst position

What CEOs Expect From An Interview Candidate Friday, May 25 2012 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahsweeney/2012/05/23/what-ceos-expect-from-an-interview-candidate/

Having written about what CEOs look for in the resumes of job applicants last week, I enjoyed it so much I thought I’d bring you along for the first interview.

First interviews are tricky because like a resume, there’s no way of knowing exactly what the prospective employer is expecting to hear you say and whether the answers you give are indeed the “right” answers. All you can do, beyond ignoring that pile of butterflies in your stomach, is take a deep breath, put on your best tailored suit, and come in confident about what you do know about the place you’re applying to work with.

But there are ways to kick your first impression up a higher notch than showing up in a sharp suit. Expectations that I like to look for aim to keep the interviewing process less nerve-wracking and more… well… just less nerve-wracking than it needs to be.

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

http://www.thedailymuse.com/job-search/i-spy-how-to-scope-out-a-company-before-the-interview/

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

On top of that, if you’ve built a good relationship with the recruiter or the person scheduling your interview, use that relationship to your advantage. Ask her if there’s anything you should know about each of your interviewers, or “what is (insert interviewer’s name here) looking for in the perfect candidate?” She may not share all, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

 

 

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

 

Ignored After that Interview? Don’t Do This! Tuesday, May 22 2012 

http://www.workcoachcafe.com/2012/05/21/ignored-after-that-job-interview/

Yes, too frequently, job seekers are ignored and treated rudely.  Particularly after an interview, when some sort of face-to-face, or at least voice-to-voice, connection has presumably been made, an acknowledgement of the event and the job seeker’s standing in the process should be made but might not happen.

This can be enormously discouraging and disheartening for job seekers.  And, some run out of patience with the whole situation.  One WorkCoachCafe.com reader, obviously at the end of her rope, described in a comment how she really dumped on the hiring manager when she finally got the hiring manager on the phone.

“I may regret it later but I feel good now. I stood up to an unprofessional hiring manager who gave me a waste-of-time interview.  I gave her a piece of my mind…  I just hung up. I feel good though! I struck a blow for all frustrated job seekers.”

Yes! We can all understand that feeling, and cheer this job seeker who was able to do some much-deserved venting.

 

Acing The Phone Interview: Give It Your All When You Answer The Call Wednesday, May 16 2012 

http://www.welcometotheoccupation.com/2012/05/acing-phone-interview-give-it-your-all.html

The phone interview is a popular preliminary measure for hiring managers for many different reasons. For one, it saves more time and money than a formal in-person interview, while making it easier to filter out unfit candidates and increase accessibility for distant applicants. Despite the importance of this process, too many applicants immediately hear the word “conference call interview” and think of the process as an informal, less serious version of a traditional interview.

However, I can tell you I’m now sitting in my office chair because I took the phone interview seriously. My current company first called me to set up a phone interview, which did take me by surprise. We set up an appointment for a few days later, and I carved out time on my lunch schedule to take the call. A week later, I was called in for an actual interview. Ideally, you’ll be able to take a call at your home like I was, even if you have to make a little extra time for it. If you can’t, choose somewhere quiet, like an office or your car. But don’t fall into the trap of thinking that phone interviews aren’t important just because you’re sitting in a Subaru!

Since you likely came across this article by searching for phone interview tips, congratulations: You’re one of the few who does value the importance of a phone interview. To make it a success, follow these top four crucial tips.

 

Avoid Doing These 5 Things at an Interview Wednesday, May 16 2012 

http://www.careerealism.com/avoid-doing-things-interview/

In my previous article, “You Only Have 3 Seconds to Get the Job Offer,” I promised to explain how I know who should get an interview.

The interview with me, a recruiter, is simple: If you meet the minimum qualifications to be considered, I’ll bring you in for the interview. Then the fun starts.

There are a number of sure-fire signs that a person should not be submitted to a client. And I am not talking here about the basics: being late; being dressed inappropriately; smelling bad (from perfume, cologne, or cigarette smoke); bad mouthing current or past employers; talking about sex, religion or politics; all the basics that everyone knows – or should know!

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