9 tips to prepare for a job interview Tuesday, Jun 12 2012 

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505125_162-57450010/9-tips-to-prepare-for-a-job-interview?tag=nl.e854

If you watch elite athletes right before a competition, you’ll see they are fiercely focused. Whether they’re quietly preparing or psyching themselves up as a team, all the attention is directed at the goal ahead. Last-minute job interview preparations are similarly important.

Take these 9 steps from the moment you exit your car or step off public transportation and before you sit down to snag your dream job, and you’ll be at the top of your game at go-time.

 

Check Twitter one last time.
Presumably you’ve done your due diligence prior to heading to your interview — Google, LinkedIn, Facebook, the whole social media shebang. On your way in, tap on Twitter and the company’s website one last time to see if there is any company breaking news you might be able to relevantly reference. “It will make you seem interested, informed and help you stand out from other candidates,” says Meryl Weinsaft Cooper, co-author of Be Your Own Best Publicist: Using PR Skills to Get Noticed, Hired and Rewarded At Work.

 

Check yourself out, too.
Especially if your appointment is after lunch, find a mirror and do a quick stain/spinach-in-teeth check. So simple, yet so often forgotten in the well-intentioned desire not to be late. “One of my clients, in her haste to dress and rush to the interview, discovered that she was wearing her blouse inside-out,” says Roy Cohen, career coach and author of The Wall Street Professional’s Survival Guide.

 

Advertisements

10 Questions You Need To Ask In A Job Interview Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

http://thegrindstone.com/work-life-balance/10-questions-you-need-to-ask-in-a-job-interview-689/

If you’re a job seeker, then you know all about job interviews. You know what to wear, when to show up, and the answers to the toughest questions that are bound to come your way.

One surprising thing that not every job seeker knows about interviews is the fact that an interview is a two-way street. Just like an informational interview, a job interview should end with both interviewer and interviewee feeling informed.

What does this mean?

When a job interview is effectively a two-way street, the job seeker interviews the interviewer and gains more information in order to make an adequate decision about whether or not the position is a good fit for them.

4 Major Interview Mistakes (and How to Recover) Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

4 Interview Mistakes and How to Recover

After sending out countless resumes, you’ve finally landed a job interview with your dream company. You’ve picked the perfect outfit, tucked ample copies of your resume into your folder, and practiced your answers over and over.

And then—it happens. You realize the interview was at 11:30, not 1:30. You spot an error on your resume. Or you make some other totally avoidable mistake that you know, backwards and forwards, that you should never, ever make as an interviewee.

No matter how thoroughly you prepare, mistakes can still happen during the job application and interview process. But, they don’t always mean game over—yes, even imperfect people get jobs. If you’ve made one of these common blunders, a few key steps can help you make the best of a bad situation.

 

What CEOs Expect From An Interview Candidate Friday, May 25 2012 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahsweeney/2012/05/23/what-ceos-expect-from-an-interview-candidate/

Having written about what CEOs look for in the resumes of job applicants last week, I enjoyed it so much I thought I’d bring you along for the first interview.

First interviews are tricky because like a resume, there’s no way of knowing exactly what the prospective employer is expecting to hear you say and whether the answers you give are indeed the “right” answers. All you can do, beyond ignoring that pile of butterflies in your stomach, is take a deep breath, put on your best tailored suit, and come in confident about what you do know about the place you’re applying to work with.

But there are ways to kick your first impression up a higher notch than showing up in a sharp suit. Expectations that I like to look for aim to keep the interviewing process less nerve-wracking and more… well… just less nerve-wracking than it needs to be.

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

http://www.thedailymuse.com/job-search/i-spy-how-to-scope-out-a-company-before-the-interview/

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

On top of that, if you’ve built a good relationship with the recruiter or the person scheduling your interview, use that relationship to your advantage. Ask her if there’s anything you should know about each of your interviewers, or “what is (insert interviewer’s name here) looking for in the perfect candidate?” She may not share all, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

 

 

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

 

Nail the “Tell Me About Yourself” Job Interview Question Monday, May 21 2012 

http://lifehacker.com/5911124/nail-the-tell-me-about-yourself-job-interview-question-with-this-three+part-answer

The “tell me about yourself” job interview question isn’t just a warm up question, but, as with the other questions, a chance to sell yourself as the perfect candidate for the job. Prepare your best answer with this three-part statement approach.

The Personal Branding Blog recommends you craft your answer to include a summary of your career history (one sentence), an example of one career accomplishment (one or two sentences), and a summary of what you want next in your career that’s relevant to the position at hand (one or two sentences).

Here’s the example given:

 

 

Acing The Phone Interview: Give It Your All When You Answer The Call Wednesday, May 16 2012 

http://www.welcometotheoccupation.com/2012/05/acing-phone-interview-give-it-your-all.html

The phone interview is a popular preliminary measure for hiring managers for many different reasons. For one, it saves more time and money than a formal in-person interview, while making it easier to filter out unfit candidates and increase accessibility for distant applicants. Despite the importance of this process, too many applicants immediately hear the word “conference call interview” and think of the process as an informal, less serious version of a traditional interview.

However, I can tell you I’m now sitting in my office chair because I took the phone interview seriously. My current company first called me to set up a phone interview, which did take me by surprise. We set up an appointment for a few days later, and I carved out time on my lunch schedule to take the call. A week later, I was called in for an actual interview. Ideally, you’ll be able to take a call at your home like I was, even if you have to make a little extra time for it. If you can’t, choose somewhere quiet, like an office or your car. But don’t fall into the trap of thinking that phone interviews aren’t important just because you’re sitting in a Subaru!

Since you likely came across this article by searching for phone interview tips, congratulations: You’re one of the few who does value the importance of a phone interview. To make it a success, follow these top four crucial tips.

 

Interview Translation: What 4 Common Questions Really Mean Wednesday, May 16 2012 

http://www.thedailymuse.com/job-search/interview-translation-what-4-common-questions-really-mean/

Acing the interview isn’t just about having theperfect canned speeches. Yes, you need to show off your experience, talents, and personality—but before answering each question, you also have to figure out what the interviewer is actually asking you.

Those seemingly innocuous questions, like “tell me about yourself” and “where do you see yourself in a few years?” aren’t just get-to-know-you conversation starters. They’re one of the key ways an interviewer will seek to uncover whether you’re the right fit for the job.

So, before you start to share your life story—or recite the same answer you gave at the last interview—it’s important to figure out what the interviewer really wants to know. Check out our guide to translating interviewer-speak, and learn how to plot your answers accordingly.

 

1. Question: Tell me about yourself.

Translation: Tell me why you’re the right fit for this job.

The interviewer already has your resume and cover letter, so she’s not looking for a rundown of your employment history. Nor does she care that you grew up in Boston and love to jog on the weekends. She’s looking for a pitch—one that’s concise, compelling, and keeps her attention, and one that tells her exactly why you’re the right fit for the job.

 

Tools to prepare for your next interview Tuesday, May 15 2012 

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505143_162-57430559/tools-to-prepare-for-your-next-interview/?tag=nl.e854

Getting ready for a job interview? You don’t have to rely on your wits and cunning alone; technology is here to make the ordeal a little less grueling. I’ve rounded up a handful of apps and Web sites you can use to brush up on your interviewing skills. And if you are a hiring manager preparing to conduct interviews over the phone, I’ve got something for you here as well.

Get interview advice online. I don’t often find myself at About.com, but that’s a mistake: Each section of the site is curated by a human being who keeps it up to date and full of valuable information. The Job Searching section is no exception, and you’ll find details on how to conduct yourself on a phone interview, how to dress for success, avoiding mistakes on the day of the interview, and more.

Improve your speaking skills. Your verbal skills are the most important tool at your disposal when being interviewed, so it pays to be a great speaker. Sure, you could join an organization like Toastmasters to hone your speaking skills, but there are easy things you can do without leaving home as well. Check out SayHired, where you can practice your phone interview skills with a real phone call, for free.

Next Page »