10 Questions You Need To Ask In A Job Interview Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

http://thegrindstone.com/work-life-balance/10-questions-you-need-to-ask-in-a-job-interview-689/

If you’re a job seeker, then you know all about job interviews. You know what to wear, when to show up, and the answers to the toughest questions that are bound to come your way.

One surprising thing that not every job seeker knows about interviews is the fact that an interview is a two-way street. Just like an informational interview, a job interview should end with both interviewer and interviewee feeling informed.

What does this mean?

When a job interview is effectively a two-way street, the job seeker interviews the interviewer and gains more information in order to make an adequate decision about whether or not the position is a good fit for them.

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In Your Job Search, Are You Looking for Excuses or Solutions? Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

http://www.careerrocketeer.com/2012/05/in-your-job-search-are-you-looking-for-excuses-or-solutions.html

Are you a “glass is half full” or “glass is half empty” kind of person?

Some people… whenever they hit an obstacle in their job search or in their life… they stall, and decide that the obstacle looms so large that it’s unlikely they will be able to get past it. When they talk to others, they can describe the obstacle in great detail. Clearly, they have a good excuse. It’s obvious why it’s “impossible” to go further.

Others… may see the same obstacle, and begin exploring how they can get around it, over it, under it, or through it. They realize they have a challenge. They understand that it may take some creativity and harder work than expected, however, they are determined to find a solution. They decide they are not going to be kept from their destination by an obstacle in the road, and as a result, they often achieve the “impossible”.

 

4 Major Interview Mistakes (and How to Recover) Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

4 Interview Mistakes and How to Recover

After sending out countless resumes, you’ve finally landed a job interview with your dream company. You’ve picked the perfect outfit, tucked ample copies of your resume into your folder, and practiced your answers over and over.

And then—it happens. You realize the interview was at 11:30, not 1:30. You spot an error on your resume. Or you make some other totally avoidable mistake that you know, backwards and forwards, that you should never, ever make as an interviewee.

No matter how thoroughly you prepare, mistakes can still happen during the job application and interview process. But, they don’t always mean game over—yes, even imperfect people get jobs. If you’ve made one of these common blunders, a few key steps can help you make the best of a bad situation.

 

Epic Win Thursday, May 24 2012 

From http://geeksarewired.com/2012/04/20/epic-win/

#WIN

I absolutely love this infographic for its simplicity, however, I would encourage anyone who sits in the ‘Rich but Bored’ category to do something about it!! If you are truly good at something, and are well paid for it, there is absolutely a way to make your job more fulfilling – find a sponsor, or talk to your manager about finding ways to get you into the #Win space – otherwise they may just lose one of there best staff, and they certainly don’t want that.

It also is just as relevant when you are searching for a job – where do you want to be? Is ‘Rich but Bored’ going to give you job satisfaction? Or do you only go to work to pay the bills?

 

– Conduit

 

 

How to Juggle Multiple Job Offers Wednesday, May 23 2012 

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/05/21/how-to-juggle-multiple-job-offers

A job offer is usually welcome news—unless it comes while you’re waiting to hear about a different job you really want with a different employer.

While many job-seekers might see this as a good problem to have, it’s a tough spot to be in. And most job-seekers aren’t sure how to navigate it well. After all, can you put the first company off, and if so, for how long? What should you say to the first company in the meantime? And can you take the offer but rescind your acceptance later if the other job comes through?

 

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

http://www.thedailymuse.com/job-search/i-spy-how-to-scope-out-a-company-before-the-interview/

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

On top of that, if you’ve built a good relationship with the recruiter or the person scheduling your interview, use that relationship to your advantage. Ask her if there’s anything you should know about each of your interviewers, or “what is (insert interviewer’s name here) looking for in the perfect candidate?” She may not share all, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

 

 

I Spy: How to Scope Out a Company Before the Interview Wednesday, May 23 2012 

It’s the day before your interview, and your mind starts racing. What is the company going to be like? What types of people will you meet? Will you fit in?

Stay calm, dear interviewee. To ease your pre-interview jitters—and to give yourself a leg up—throw on your Angela Lansbury hat and do some spying on the company. The more information you have ahead of time, the better you can plot your strategy, go in feeling confident, and rock your interview. Believe me, most interviewees don’t do much of this research—but you can, and it’ll give you an extra edge.

 

Step 1: Ask the Right Questions

Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Hopefully, they’ll give you this information without asking, but if not, don’t be shy—it’s completely normal to request it.

 

Soft skills still outweigh education in entry-level hires: infographic Tuesday, May 22 2012 

http://econsultancy.com/uk/blog/9816-soft-skills-still-outweigh-education-in-entry-level-hires-infographic-2

4 Obstacles To Changing Careers In 2012 And How To Overcome Them Tuesday, May 22 2012 

http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/05/21/4-obstacles-to-changing-careers-in-2012-and-how-to-overcome-them/

The economy is showing signs of life. And that means millions of people who have been stuck in jobs they hate will start looking for work. A 2011 survey indicated that 84 percent of Americans planned to look for a new job when the economy improved. And yet, the reality is that only a small percentage of them will be successful in changing careers. Here’s why.


1. Social Media

For all the talk about how social media can help you network your way to a new job, the real truth is: It can also hold you back from one. About 3 out of 4 hiring managers admit to doing a search on a candidate before interviewing them. Of those who do, more than 50 percent say that they opted not to have the person in for an interview based on what they found. Like it or not, hiring IS discrimination. Thanks to social media, the discrimination now happens even earlier in the recruitment process.

Nail the “Tell Me About Yourself” Job Interview Question Monday, May 21 2012 

http://lifehacker.com/5911124/nail-the-tell-me-about-yourself-job-interview-question-with-this-three+part-answer

The “tell me about yourself” job interview question isn’t just a warm up question, but, as with the other questions, a chance to sell yourself as the perfect candidate for the job. Prepare your best answer with this three-part statement approach.

The Personal Branding Blog recommends you craft your answer to include a summary of your career history (one sentence), an example of one career accomplishment (one or two sentences), and a summary of what you want next in your career that’s relevant to the position at hand (one or two sentences).

Here’s the example given:

 

 

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