10 Job Interview Tips From A CEO Headhunter Friday, Jun 15 2012 

http://www.fastcompany.com/1839723/9-job-interview-tips-from-a-ceo-headhunter

Whether you’re being interviewed to be an intern or a CEO, you’re going to run into a few notoriously tricky questions–here’s a road map of what you’ll be asked, and how to craft impressive answers to even the toughest questions.

No two situations are ever exactly the same, but as a general guide, these are the types of questions that could come up in a typical interview.

1. Why don’t you tell me about yourself?

This question, often the interview opener, has a crucial objective: to see how you handle yourself in unstructured situations. The recruiter wants to see how articulate you are, how confident you are, and generally what type of impression you would make on the people with whom you come into contact on the job. The recruiter also wants to learn about the trajectory of your career and to get a sense of what you think is important and what has caused you to perform well.

Most candidates find this question a difficult one to answer. However, the upside is that this question offers an opportunity to describe yourself positively and focus the interview on your strengths. Be prepared to deal with it.

There are many ways to respond to this question correctly and just one wrong way: by asking, “What do you want to know?” You need to develop a good answer to this question, practice it, and be able to deliver it with poise and confidence.

The right response is twofold: focus on what interests the interviewer, and highlight your most important accomplishments.

Focus on what interests the interviewer

Do not dwell on your personal history–that is not why you are there. Start with your most recent employment and explain why you are well qualified for the position. The key to all successful interviewing is to match your qualifications to what the interviewer is looking for. You want to be selling what the buyer is buying.

Highlight Important Accomplishments

Have a story ready that illustrates your best professional qualities. For example, if you tell an interviewer that people describe you as creative, provide a brief story that shows how you have been creative in achieving your goals.

Stories are powerful and are what people remember most.

A good interviewee will memorize a 60-second commercial that clearly demonstrates why he or she is the best person for the job.

2. How long have you been with your current (or former) employer?

This is a hot-button question if your résumé reflects considerable job-hopping. Excellent performers tend to stay in their jobs at least three to five years. They implement course corrections, bring in new resources, and, in general, learn how to survive–that’s why they are valued by prospective employers.

If your résumé reflects jobs with companies that were acquired, moved, closed, or downsized, it is still viewed as a job-hopper’s history. Volunteer and go to events where hiring authorities may be found. Ratchet up your networking to include anything that exposes you to hiring authorities who can get past your tenure issue because now they know you. Your networking efforts have never been so important.


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The number one question to ask in your job interview Sunday, May 6 2012 

http://mildredtalabi.com/the-number-one-question-to-ask-in-your-job-interview

Interviews can be one of the hardest hurdles to overcome in the job search process. In fact, some interviews can be intimidating for jobseekers, particularly where you have a panel of two, three or more interviewers looking on at you from the other side of the table.

But one of the hardest parts of the interview is that end part where the interviewer throws the ball in your court and asks, “So, do you have any questions for me?”

Asking the right question at your interview can help to build confidence on both sides of the table

To remain silent at this point could literally cost you the job so you have to be ready and prepared with one question you can ask (although aim for much more than one – three’s a good number).

Questions give you a real chance to shine as a candidate and set yourself apart from the competition. They demonstrate your interest in the job and the organisation; they allow you to engage in further conversation with the interviewer and thus build rapport, and, depending on the quality of your questions, they give the interviewer further insight into the depth of your knowledge and your level of intelligence concerning the field.